ONE MORE TIME!

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Wow--the response to the lectures I've presented this spring on being a vegan athlete has been amazing! Clearly the topic of fine tuning our diets for sports performance is of interest, likely in part due to hubbub around films like James Cameron's The Game Changers, and the forthcoming book by vegan ultrarunning record-breaking Scott Jurek. 

It's been a pleasure talking about the potential and pitfalls of choosing this lifestyle, and I've fielded some fantastic questions. 

Those in attendance have ranged from long-time vegans, to new vegetarians, to those just curious about this diet and lifestyle. I met new runners, a couple ladies pursuing a half-marathon in every state (they even have plans for the boring states!), and runners of all ages looking to raise their game.

 Thanks, Instagrammer @runwithjoy26.2, for sharing this post after the talk on April 4!

Thanks, Instagrammer @runwithjoy26.2, for sharing this post after the talk on April 4!

By popular demand, I'm hosting this talk ONE MORE TIME: Join me at TriSport Junction in Sykesville on Wednesday, April 18th, and let’s talk about the plant-based athlete! RSVP HERE.

Questions I'll be sure to answer include:

  • Will going vegan make me faster?
  • Do vegans recover more quickly?
  • Will I have to supplement?

...and the big one:

  • Where do vegan athletes get their protein?

Hope to see you on the 18th!

Got too many questions for a group talk? Let's meet one-on-one! Contact me here to make an appointment. 

 

Walking is Wonderful!

Blame social media, blame extreme sports, blame human nature and our need to constantly one-up each other, but over the last few years, a dangerous perception has become normalized: On the day after leg day, if you can get off the toilet without gripping the wall and grimacing in pain, you didn't work hard enough.  

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There is a commonly accepted idea that only drastic, painful workouts will advance you toward your fitness goals--including weight loss goals. If your workout is not excessively complicated, and if you're not in pain during--and especially after--your workout, it won't have any impact on your fitness.  

This couldn't be further from the truth. Unless your fitness goals include being a model or competing athletically at a professional level, every workout doesn't have to decimate you.

And this on National Walking Day, I want to remind you that regular walking--especially outdoors--can be a fantastic way to gain fitness, manage and prevent lifestyle diseases, lift your mood, and yes, even lose weight. Multiply the benefits by drafting in a friend or family member (two- or four-legged), finding a tree-lined trail to explore, and--this is important--walking consistently.

More on the benefits of walking HERE. Need support becoming the healthiest version of you? Let's talk.

Snacking: Friend or Foe?

Snacking can go either way:

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A. It can be an opportunity to add more nourishment to your diet and to bolster your health and fitness goals, or

B. It can be a great way to really screw the pooch and negate all the healthful habits you've been practicing. 

Ironically, some of the worst "B" snacking happens when we try not to snack at all: White knuckling it for several hours between meals can lead to raging hunger and impulsive choices. Those chips in the breakroom that were so easy to ignore yesterday call out your name today when you're stuck at work an extra hour. 

Rather than stumbling into the B category of snacks, plan for the A category, especially on days when you're especially active. Not sure what qualifies as an A snack?

A truly healthful diet is about half produce (heavier on the veg vs fruit), a quarter protein (whole protein, not protein powder or bars) and a quarter whole grains.

Now consider your diet: How close do you come to these ratios? Look at the areas where you have the biggest need, and pack snacks to close that gap. 

Need support in planning more A snacks? Let's talk.

Can Runners Thrive on a Plant-Based Diet

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Thanks to everyone who joined me Thursday evening to answer the question: Can runners thrive on a plant-based diet?

No doubt you’ve seen fitness influencers posting their impossibly lean bodies posed with green smoothies, espousing the benefits of going vegan. And you've likely read about or seen documentaries on how athletes are trying out this way of eating with amazing results.

But can a runner like you or me really thrive on a plant-based diet?

Maybe.

Let’s back up for a minute for some definitions: A vegan diet is one that eschews all animal products: No red meat, poultry or seafood; no dairy, eggs, gelatin or honey. (These choices also extend to a vegan’s lifestyle, where they avoid animal-derived products like wool, leather and more.) A vegetarian diet excludes all animal flesh, but depending on the individual, may have more flexibility to include animal derived products, like dairy or honey.

From an ethical standpoint, a vegan diet is a compassionate choice, and there are tremendous environmental benefits to eliminating or even reducing meat consumption.

But here’s the kicker: Other than the exclusion of animal products, there are no other parameters around this way of eating, so being vegan is not synonymous with being healthy. In fact, there is a ginormous range of heavily marketed vegan junk food, from cookie dough to highly sweetened yogurt alternatives, to boxed mac and cheese. Active people adopting a vegan diet need to do diligent research to make sure their diet adequately meets their needs, not just as a runner but as a human. Additionally, if one chooses this diet without a supportive network of family or friends, it can be socially isolating.

Following are the five most common questions I hear from veg-curious runners:

WILL GOING VEGAN MAKE ME A BETTER RUNNER?

Eschewing animal products does not guarantee you’ll be a faster runner, better fueled, or faster recovery. ALL runners benefit from eating a health-promoting diet like the model from the Harvard School of Public Health, which is adaptable to omnivores, vegetarians or vegans:

  • Half of a nutritious diet is made up of non-starchy vegetables and some whole fruit
  • A quarter of the diet is healthful proteins
  • A quarter is whole grains and/or starchy vegetables.

If your way of eating falls way outside these parameters, whether you're a vegan, vegetarian or omnivore, your body may not be getting the nutrients it needs.


DO VEGAN ATHLETES RECOVER FASTER?

Principles of healthful fueling apply to plant-based athletes, too: Vegetables, whole fruit, nuts, seeds, whole grains + legumes are vital to a healthy body, as is eliminating inflammatory foods, including many animal products, fried food + sugary junk. Fueling well before and after workouts is also key for speedy recovery. More on that what and when to eat before, during and after workouts HERE.


WILL I NEED TO SUPPLEMENT?

Some vital nutrients do not occur naturally in significant amounts in a whole food, plant-based diet. They must be consumed via fortified foods, in supplement form, or very deliberately eaten as whole foods:

B12 is required for healthy blood and nerve cells, as well as production of DNA, and it’s the one non-negotiable supplement vegans must take. B12 deficiency accumulates over years and can be devastating to the body. To achieve the recommended 2.4mcg/day, supplements are the most convenient option. There are some fortified foods, like nutritional yeast, some cereals + plant milks, but this route is tougher.

Iodide regulates thyroid and supports metabolism and is found in eggs, fish, dairy and sea vegetables in small amounts. ¼ teaspoon of iodized salt contains nearly half the recommended daily value.

Omega 3 fatty acids DHA + EPA are vital in managing inflammation, and necessary for brain + heart health. They’re found in cold water fish (the fish get them from algae). Omega 3 fats as ALA are in flax, hemp + chia seeds, you may need to eat 10-50 times the amount of ALA to convert it to adequate DHA + EPA. Eating less Omega 6 fats from processed foods like soybean oil is also key.

Depending on your unique needs and diet, whether you’re plant-based or an omnivore, you may need additional supplements, such as vitamin D (which many are deficient in regardless of diet), zinc or iron. There is no need to self-diagnose vitamin and mineral deficiencies when they are easily detectable by blood tests ordered by your doctor. 


WHAT ABOUT CALCIUM?

The RDA for calcium for adults is 1,000 mg/day (1,200mg/day for women >50 + men >70). This is achievable with whole foods: There are 80mg calcium in 1 cup edamame, 100mg in 1 cup cooked kale, 160mg in ½ cup white beans, 140mg in 1 tablespoon of sesame seeds. Fortified plant milks have 300-450mg/cup. You can see how an intentional combination of foods could easily add up to meet daily needs.


AND THE BIG QUESTION: WHERE WILL YOU GET YOUR PROTEIN?

To determine your Recommended Daily Allowance—the amount you need to meet basic nutritional requirements—for protein, multiply your weight in pounds by 0.36. (You can also get a more detailed calculation based on your gender, age and activity level on using a calculator HERE). For example, the basic protein requirement for a 130-pound woman is about 47 grams daily, and a 180-pound man is 65 grams daily. A more active person will most definitely require more.

If your diet follows the Healthy Eating Plate proportions, your protein needs can be easily met without ever touching protein powder or bars. Whole grains, nuts + seeds, and legumes (including whole soy) all provide excellent protein, and even fruit and vegetables provide small amounts that add up to your daily needs. This example of a fairly light day of eating shows how easily 75.9 grams of protein add up:

Breakfast - 13 grams

  • .5 cup oats: 6g
  • 1 Tbsp chia seeds: 2g
  • 1 banana: 1g
  • 1 Tbsp peanut butter: 4g
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened almond milk: 0g

Snack - 6.5 grams

  • Apple: 0.5g
  • Handful of almonds (1 oz): 6g

Lunch - 25 grams

  • 2 slices sprouted grain bread: 8g
  • Avocado half: 2g
  • Green salad: 2g
  • 1/4 cup cooked farro: 3g
  • 3 Tbsp hemp hearts: 10g

Snack - 5 grams

  • Handful of carrot sticks: 1g
  • Hummus, 1/4 cup: 4g

Dinner - 30 grams

  • Green salad: 2g
  • 1 Tbsp tahini (sesame seed paste): 3g
  • Whole wheat pasta serving: 7g
  • Green beans: 2g
  • Marinated cooked tempeh: 16g

Final verdict: If you’re driven by a strong motivation to choose this lifestyle, and if you’re willing to do a bit of extra homework to make sure your nutrition needs—as well as social and emotional needs—are adequately met, veganism can be a healthful choice that supports an active lifestyle.

Even if you don't want to commit to a fully vegan lifestyle, we can all benefit eating more vegetables and adopting the proportions of the Healthy Eating Plate, where protein represents a smaller portion of the diet than most American's consume.  

Got questions? Please be in touch!

This information is not intended to prevent, treat or diagnose any disease, and should not supersede recommendations prescribed to you by a medical professional.

I wish I could sell you that weight loss pill

If you're on social media, you are undoubtedly seeing a few friends posting how an amazing weight loss supplement has really helped them shed the pounds, lose belly fat and get shredded, all without having to change their diet! Your friend insists these all-natural pills/shakes/bars/superfoods/drinks speed up metabolism, keep hunger at bay and melt fat.

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Not only does your friend love these supplements, she knows you'll love them so much that you'll want to sell them, too! And if you do join her sales team, then you can buy these great supplements from her at a special discount. What a deal! 

I wish I could sell you weight loss pills that would do make weight loss so effortless.

Only catch is that these pills don't exist.

If they did, we'd all be on them, we'd all have lightning fast metabolisms, and we'd all be super shredded. 

You know what does work for weight loss? Building healthy habits. You know, eating nutritious food, moving your body, sleeping well and controlling your stress level. There's no magic to it, but these habits take time and consistency to build. Save yourself time, energy money and angst and get to work on building those habits now. 

Need some support?  Please be in touch to schedule a one-on-one consult or with your questions!